Back in the day, steel was the material of choice for most golf shaft manufacturers. Today, some golf shafts are still made from steel, such as some True Temper golf shafts, but most modern golf shafts are instead made from graphite or some composite material.

Steel is extremely durable and tough, not to mention very stiff, which is a trait that many experienced golfers prefer. So why is it then – or why does it seem, at least – that the best golf club shafts are all made of graphite or composite material instead?

Steel Is Tough, but…
It is true that steel golf shafts were once much more popular than they are today, so the fact that steel shafts are not as prevalent today can’t be due to an inherent lack of quality.

Steel is, as you can imagine, both very strong and immensely durable. Those traits carry over into steel golf shafts. They are very strong and very tough.

Steel is also very stiff. Since players with high swing speeds and well-practiced form often desire stiffness and consistency in form, this can be an advantage for steel.

However, steel is very heavy. There is no way to produce steel shafts that are as light as modern graphite or compositive shafts. The weight of a golf shaft may its most important attribute, but to discount it entirely wouldn’t paint an accurate picture either.

In addition, one of the disadvantages of steel is that it is different to produce significant variability in stiffness. That very trait that makes steel appealing to some players makes it undesirable for others, specifically for amateur players with slower swing speeds and experienced players with very precise skill sets and requirements that steel just won’t meet.

Graphite: Also Tough, but Light and Flexible
Graphite shafts have soared in popularity for a number of reasons, and in recent years, most golf shafts are made from carbon or composites, some of which contain steel or other metal meshes or reinforcements.

Graphite is inherently less dense than steel, which means it can be used to produce both very light and relatively heavy shafts. It is more versatile as a material, in that respect.

Graphite is also very strong. Perhaps it is not as strong as steel, and when abused can splinter or break, but it is still a highly durable material nonetheless.

Graphite’s great advantage, however, is its amazing variability. Graphite can be used to produce extra stiff shafts as well as those that are extra flexible. Graphite can be treated with a metal mesh, or its density can be adjusted, in order to make it lighter, heavier, stronger, or more or less flexible.

Most importantly, graphite shafts can be precision engineered with respect to torque rating, kick point, and flexibility at different points of the shaft. A graphite shaft can be designed and then tested for extraordinarily precise levels of flexibility through the tip section, near the grips (the butt section), or around the midpoint of the shaft.

This attribute enables graphite shafts to be produced that will very closely suit players’ needs, enabling them to hone their skills, potentially improving accuracy, control, and range.

The Best Golf Club Shafts Online, Bar None
Looking for the best golf club shafts in the industry? Visit Dallas Golf Company online at DallasGolf.com and you’ll find some of the best shafts on the market. Their collection includes some of the best shaft options available in terms of brand and selection. With a full range of driver shafts, wood, and iron shafts and plenty of selection reflecting top brands, there’s something for every player’s tastes regardless of the level of experience.

Visit their website today (DallasGolf.com) or contact them by phone at 800-955-9550 if you need further assistance in selecting the best golf club shafts for you.

For more information about Mitsubishi Shafts and Fujikura Ventus Please visit: Dallas Golf Company Inc.

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